The similarities and differences of the four types of learning

General links provide information about one or more forms of the strategy.

The similarities and differences of the four types of learning

Integrating styles and intelligences can help children learn in many ways—not just in the areas of their strengths. In the 20th century, two great theories have been put forward in an attempt to interpret human differences and to design educational models around these differences. Learning-style theory has its roots in the psychoanalytic community; multiple intelligences theory is the fruit of cognitive science and reflects an effort to rethink the theory of measurable intelligence embodied in intelligence testing.

Both, in fact, combine insights from biology, anthropology, psychology, medical case studies, and an examination of art and culture. But learning styles emphasize the different ways people think and feel as they solve problems, create products, and interact. The theory of multiple intelligences is an effort to understand how cultures and disciplines shape human potential.

Though both theories claim that dominant ideologies of intelligence inhibit our understanding of human differences, learning styles are concerned with differences in the process of learning, whereas multiple intelligences center on the content and products of learning. Until now, neither theory has had much to do with the other.

Howard Gardner spells out the difference between the theories this way: In MI theory, I begin with a human organism that responds or fails to respond to different kinds of contents in the world.

Those who speak of learning styles are searching for approaches that ought to characterize all contents p. We believe that the integration of learning styles and multiple intelligence theory may minimize their respective limitations and enhance their strengths, and we provide some practical suggestions for teachers to successfully integrate and apply learning styles and multiple intelligence theory in the classroom.

Learning Styles Learning-style theory begins with Carl Jungwho noted major differences in the way people perceived sensation versus intuitionthe way they made decisions logical thinking versus imaginative feelingsand how active or reflective they were while interacting extroversion versus introversion.

Although learning-style theorists interpret the personality in various ways, nearly all models have two things in common: A focus on process.

Learning-style models tend to concern themselves with the process of learning: An emphasis on personality. Learning-style theorists generally believe that learning is the result of a personal, individualized act of thought and feeling.

[BINGSNIPMIX-3

Most learning-style theorists have settled on four basic styles. Our own model, for instance, describes the following four styles: The Mastery style learner absorbs information concretely; processes information sequentially, in a step-by-step manner; and judges the value of learning in terms of its clarity and practicality.

The Understanding style learner focuses more on ideas and abstractions; learns through a process of questioning, reasoning, and testing; and evaluates learning by standards of logic and the use of evidence.

The Self-Expressive style learner looks for images implied in learning; uses feelings and emotions to construct new ideas and products; and judges the learning process according to its originality, aesthetics, and capacity to surprise or delight.

Learning styles are not fixed throughout life, but develop as a person learns and grows. Our approximate breakdown of the percentages of people with strengths in each style is as follows: Mastery, 35 percent; Understanding, 18 percent; Self-Expressive, 12 percent; and Interpersonal, 35 percent Silver and Strong Most learning-style advocates would agree that all individuals develop and practice a mixture of styles as they live and learn.

The similarities and differences of the four types of learning

In fact, most people seek a sense of wholeness by practicing all four styles to some degree. Educators should help students discover their unique profiles, as well as a balance of styles. Strengths and Limitations of a Learning-Style Model The following are some strengths of learning-style models: They tend to focus on how different individuals process information across many content areas.

They recognize the role of cognitive and affective processes in learning and, therefore, can significantly deepen our insights into issues related to motivation. They tend to emphasize thought as a vital component of learning, thereby avoiding reliance on basic and lower-level learning activities.

Learning-styles models have a couple of limitations. First, they may fail to recognize how styles vary in different content areas and disciplines.

Second, these models are sometimes less sensitive than they should be to the effects of context on learning. Either way, learning-style models have largely left unanswered the question of how context and purpose affect learning.

Who could have expected that a reconsideration of the word intelligence would profoundly affect the way we see ourselves and our students? Gardner describes seven intelligences: This theoretical depth is sadly lacking in most learning-style models.

We all intuitively understand the difference between musical and linguistic, or spatial and mathematical intelligences, for example.That focus on letting children learn at their own pace also affects how classrooms are arranged, with children ages three, four and five all being in the same room.

Compare and contrast the four differences in learning styles. Propose ways a trainer can help each type of learner. The initial learning style is sensing vs. intuitive learning style. Sensing learners like learning details and solving problems by well-known approach. Different from intuitive learners, sensor learners show antipathy towards testing on .

Learning Styles

In the previous four papers (Perry, ; Wang & Cai, a, b; Wong ), we presented the teachers’ views of mathematics and the teaching and learning of mathematics from four ph-vs.com this paper, we provided a comparison and contrast to highlight the similarities and differences among teachers from Australia, Mainland .

“Learning Disabilities” is an “umbrella” term describing a number of other, more specific learning disabilities, such as dyslexia and dysgraphia. Find the signs and . Similarities and Differences in Learning Styles among Students in University Programs: a Mexican Sample material should be designed for specific types of students and their learning styles, and not just the teaching style of the professor (Dagger, Wade and Conlan, ; Paredes and account whether there are differences or similarities.

The four types of learning are classical conditioning, operant conditioning, social learning, and cognitive learning.

Similarities and Differences in Learning Styles among Students in University Programs: a Mexican Sample material should be designed for specific types of students and their learning styles, and not just the teaching style of the professor (Dagger, Wade and Conlan, ; Paredes and account whether there are differences or similarities. account whether there are differences or similarities in their learning styles. Furthermore, the professor freely chooses learning techniques that he or she considers most appropriate for the class, using them for students in different programs, without taking their different learning styles into account. Compare and contrast the four differences in learning styles. Propose ways a trainer can help each type of learner. The initial learning style is sensing vs. intuitive learning style. Sensing learners like learning details and solving problems by well-known approach. Different from intuitive learners, sensor learners show antipathy towards testing on .

In this paper I will give you an overview on each type of learning and examples of each.

Learning Styles - various approaches or ways of learning