The features of obsessive compulsive disorder

Samantha Gluck Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder symptoms usually appear by early adulthood. People with OCPD exhibit a long-standing and consistent pattern of preoccupation with perfectionism, inflexibility, mental and interpersonal control, and rigid adherence to rules and procedures. What is Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder? They have difficulty expressing affection and usually only do so in a rigid, controlled manner that often seems insincere.

The features of obsessive compulsive disorder

Certain groups of symptoms usually occur together. These groups are sometimes viewed as dimensions or clusters that may reflect an underlying process.

These symptoms fit into three to five groupings. The observed groups included a "symmetry factor", a "forbidden thoughts factor", a "cleaning factor", and a "hoarding factor". The "symmetry factor" correlated highly with obsessions related to ordering, counting, and symmetry, as well as repeating compulsions.

The "forbidden thoughts factor" correlated highly with intrusive and distressing thoughts of a violent, religious, or sexual nature. The "cleaning factor" correlated highly with obsessions about contamination and compulsions related to cleaning.

The "hoarding factor" only involved hoarding related obsessions and compulsions, and was identified as being distinct from other symptom groupings. Furthermore, some subtypes have been associated with improvement in performance on certain tasks such as pattern recognition washing subtype and spatial working memory obsessive thought subtype.

Subgroups have also been distinguished by neuroimaging findings and treatment response. Neuroimaging studies on this have been too few, and the subtypes examined have differed too much to draw any conclusions.

On the other hand, subtype dependent treatment response has been studied, and the hoarding subtype has consistently responded least to treatment.

The Two Main Characteristics: Obsessions and Compulsions

Primarily obsessional obsessive compulsive disorder People with OCD may face intrusive thoughts, such as thoughts about the Devil shown is a painted interpretation of Hell Obsessions are thoughts that recur and persist, despite efforts to ignore or confront them.

Within and among individuals, the initial obsessions, or intrusive thoughts, vary in their clarity and vividness. A relatively vague obsession could involve a general sense of disarray or tension accompanied by a belief that life cannot proceed as normal while the imbalance remains.

A more intense obsession could be a preoccupation with the thought or image of someone close to them dying [14] [15] or intrusions related to " relationship rightness ". Other individuals with OCD may experience the sensation of invisible protrusions emanating from their bodies, or have the feeling that inanimate objects are ensouled.

For example, obsessive fears about sexual orientation can appear to the person with OCD, and even to those around them, as a crisis of sexual identity.

What Causes OCD?

For example, an individual who engages in compulsive hoarding might be inclined to treat inorganic matter as if it had the sentience or rights of living organisms, while accepting that such behavior is irrational on a more intellectual level. There is a debate as to whether or not hoarding should be considered with other OCD symptoms.

OCD without overt compulsions could, by one estimate, characterize as many as 50 percent to 60 percent of OCD cases. The person might feel that these actions somehow either will prevent a dreaded event from occurring or will push the event from their thoughts.

In any case, the individual's reasoning is so idiosyncratic or distorted that it results in significant distress for the individual with OCD or for those around them. Excessive skin pickinghair-pullingnail bitingand other body-focused repetitive behavior disorders are all on the obsessive—compulsive spectrum.

Some people use compulsions to avoid situations that may trigger their obsessions.

The features of obsessive compulsive disorder

Although some people do certain things over and over again, they do not necessarily perform these actions compulsively.Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder where people feel the need to check things repeatedly, perform certain routines repeatedly (called "rituals"), or have certain thoughts repeatedly (called "obsessions").

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a type of mental illness. People with OCD can have either obsessive thoughts and urges or compulsive, repetitive behaviors. Some have both obsessions and compulsions. OCPD has some of the same symptoms as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

People with OCD have unwanted thoughts, while people with OCPD believe that their thoughts are correct. In addition, OCD often begins in childhood while OCPD usually starts in the teen years or early 20s.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) features a pattern of unreasonable thoughts and fears (obsessions) that lead you to do repetitive behaviors (compulsions). These obsessions and compulsions interfere with daily activities and cause significant distress. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental health condition characterized by features called obsessions and compulsions.

Obsessions are intrusive thoughts, mental . Symptoms of OCD (Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder) According to the DSM, “The essential features of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder are recurrent obsessions or compulsions that are severe enough to be time consuming (i.e., they take more than 1 hour a day) or cause marked distress or significant impairment” (p.

).

Obsessive-compulsive disorder: Symptoms, causes, and treatment