Paley design argument essay

It is called Intelligent Design Theory. This theory disputes that the process of natural selection, the force Darwin suggested drove evolution, is enough to explain the complexity of and within living organisms. This theory holds that the complexity requires the work of an intelligent designer.

Paley design argument essay

Explain whether laws of nature are discovered or whether they are invented. The Analogical Teleological Argument of Paley: Yet this is not true if the stone were to be a watch. The inference is as follows … watch: See the similar, but more thoroughly elaborated, design argument presented by Hume in his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.

Paley thinks the following excuses i. We never knew Paley design argument essay artist capable of making a watch re a universe or we do not know how the work was accomplished.

Paley’s teleological argument for the existence of God appears, to modern minds, much more “poetic” than logical. This perception of Paley’s teleological argument is due not only to advances of scientific knowledge but due to the counter-arguments posed by key philosophers, such as David Hume. The teleological argument for the existence of God is based on the premise that the world has within it intelligent purpose and order and this leads to the conclusion that there must be a supreme designer. One form of the argument is based on the machine like qualities within the world that suggest. Essay: Teleological Argument (Paley) This answer was written by a student (Gemma) under timed conditons. Tactically this essay is launching well – many students mistakenly believe you need a summation of who Paley was – which is a waste of time. This leads onto Paley’s second argument which is design qua regularity.

The disanalogy between an artist and a universe-maker is substantial. Not only is the last term of the analogy, "the universe-maker," beyond the bounds of possible experience, but also the many persons involved in the construction of a watch—from the miners of the metals and gems, to the draftsmen, craftsmen, workers, and distributors— would seem to suggest many gods are involved in universe-making.

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The disanalogy that watchmaker has parents but the universe-maker does not have parents is also sometimes noted. The parts of the watch re universe do not work perfectly; the designer is not evident.

It is not necessary to show that something is perfect in order to show that there is a design present. Given natural disasters and nonmoral evil in the world, imperfect design would seem to indicate that the designer is neither all good nor all-powerful.

The problem of evil would then become an important consideration in any inference to the characteristics of the universe-maker. Moreover, although initially the complexity of a watch is contrasted to the simplicity of a stone, there is nothing to which the complexity of the universe can be contrasted.

Some parts of the watch re the universe seem to have no function and so would seemingly not be designed. Simply because we do not know the function of the parts does not imply that the parts have no function.

He believes the design is evident from observing the rest of the watch re the universe. The argumentum ad ignorantiam works both ways; from the fact that something has not been proved, no conclusion can be drawn.

Implicitly, as well, there is a disanalogy in composite functions of watch and universe. The purpose of a watch is evident, whereas the purpose of the universe is not. The watch re universe is only one possible form of many possible combinations and so is a chance event. The design cannot be a result of chance; no person in his senses could believe this.

In order to understand a natural process, a preliminary or conventional order is often arbitrarily imposed.

The Teleological Argument

Discoveries in science are only "the image of mind reflected on us from innumerable objects…" The appearance of the stars in the sky, seemingly disordered, can be organized in terms of patterns. What to much of the Western world is seen as the Big Dipper, the seven brightest stars of Ursa Major is also seen as a plough, a saucepan, a stretcher, a parrot, or a chariot.

To ask, "What is the "real" or objective order of that pattern of stars? Additionally, in a deterministic world, chance events can be viewed as an epistemological problem deriving from the lack of precise measurements of initial conditions and, as well, the lack of knowledge of relevant conditions of a natural process.

There is a law or principle that disposed the watch re universe to be in that form. The existence of a law presupposes a lawgiver with the power to enforce the law. A principle of order cannot cause or create the existence of the watch.

Paley confuses descriptive law with prescriptive law i. Prescriptive laws, or normative laws, imply a lawgiver, and prescriptive laws can be broken e. Descriptive laws do not imply the existence of a "law-giver," and descriptive laws cannot be broken since any such violation or exception would disprove or falsify the generality of lawe.

Descriptive laws, or natural laws, originate from the observation of regularities or from derivations of those regularities and are, in principle, falsifiable.

Teleological Argument Essay Sample

Descriptive laws are said to be "constative. Nevertheless, Paley waffles on this point vaguely indicating miracles might be part of the design: Faulder, Appleton and CompanyVol.Paley’s teleological argument for the existence of God appears, to modern minds, much more “poetic” than logical.

This perception of Paley’s teleological argument is due not only to advances of scientific knowledge but due to the counter-arguments posed by key philosophers, such as David Hume.

Paley design argument essay

Whereas Hume's argument is an argument from design, we shall see that Paley's argument is more of an argument to design. Paley thinks the following excuses (i.e., possible objections) are inadequate to disprove the watchmaker-argument. William Paley begins his “Argument from Design” by enumerating key differences between two obviously dissimilar objects—a stone and a watch.

William Paley, "The Teleological Argument"

For the sake of meaningful contrast, Paley emphasizes three distinguishing properties lacked by the former and possessed by the latter. Paley’s teleological argument for the existence of God appears, to modern minds, much more “poetic” than logical.

This perception of Paley’s teleological argument is due not only to advances of scientific knowledge but due to the counter-arguments posed by key philosophers, such as David Hume.

Essay: Teleological Argument (Paley) This answer was written by a student (Gemma) under timed conditons. Tactically this essay is launching well – many students mistakenly believe you need a summation of who Paley was – which is a waste of time.

This leads onto Paley’s second argument which is design qua regularity. Whereas Hume's argument is an argument from design, we shall see that Paley's argument is more of an argument to design.

Paley thinks the following excuses (i.e., possible objections) are inadequate to disprove the watchmaker-argument.

Essay: Teleological Argument (Paley) - Philosophical Investigations